Marie Kondo Joy Isn’t Just For Humans!

My six-year-old Westie loves watching television, even if there aren’t any dogs, horses, or other animals to bark at or observe. When we’re done with our dinner, he’ll sit close by and wait for his cue. When I say “We’re going to watch television,” he troops off to the living room, picks a chair, sits or lies down facing the large screen and waits for us to start the evening’s entertainment.

He’s a big fan of action scenes and chases, but more than that he enjoys dramatic close-ups when couples are arguing or just having an intense interaction.  I’ve watched his ears flick back and forth, his eyes widen as he surveys what’s happening.  Sometimes he rears back when he’s startled.

He was especially fond of Babe, which had lots to keep him focused, and sat through a whole hour of it, then wandered off, perhaps over-stimulated.  After the movie, though, he came back, stared at us and moved his lips just as the animals in the film seemed to do.  Maybe he was asking if there was a sequel.

So given his responsiveness, I thought I’d have him watch some of Marie Kondo’s show, and while he’s not very good at folding, he did seem fascinated.  That’s when I thought it might be time to organize his toy basket because some of the stuffed animals looked pretty disreputable after a few years of chewing, tugging, and chomping.

He clearly rejected several of them by turning his head away.  Between us we managed to reduce his toys by 1/3 and the ones that stayed clearly give him joy-joy feelings as they say in Demolition Man.  He’ll play tug of war with them, throw them around as if subduing a rabbit or some other yard demon, and basically have a great time.

I wonder if he’ll be willing to consult with me when I de-clutter my library.

A veteran of university teaching, Lev Raphael now offers creative writing workshops online at writewithoutborders.comHe’s the author of the forthcoming mystery State University of Murder and 25 other books in a wide range of genres.

EPA Chief Scott Pruitt Deserves A Private Jet ASAP!

Last year the EPA explored leasing a private jet for its adiministrator Scott Pruitt, but the plan was never carried out because apparently some of his advisors thought the monthly $100,000 cost was excessive.

That was a foolish, penny-pinching decision, worthy of Scrooge.  The EPA’s budget for the 2017 fiscal year was $8,058,488,000.  Why on earth should anyone care about a pittance like $1,200,000 a year’s worth of Pruitt’s flights?

It’s also unpatriotic and unhealthy. After all, he’s in charge of environmental protection and shouldn’t that start with his own personal environment?  If we want Pruitt to be working at his best as he works for us average Americans, he should not have to put up with the crap that the rest of us face when we fly.

A private jet would spare Pruitt from the mediocre food, cramped seats with minimal leg room, unpredictable flight delays, kids kicking seat backs, malodorous and messy restrooms, people yapping on their phones, crying babies, unwashed passengers creating their own aroma zones, drunk or garrulous seatmates, and overworked and cranky flight attendants.

If we want the best and the brightest serving the nation, they should be treated that way.  At the end of the day, $100,000 a month is a very small price to pay for protecting our environment.  And like many other government officials, he’s probably writing a memoir about his time in office, so he should be able to do that in comfort.